Cities fit for children

Today, 55% of the world’s population live in urban areas. By 2050, that proportion is expected to rise to 70%. Urban growth adds to the challenges of ensuring that children can enjoy an adequate quality of life.

Unplanned and rapid urbanisation is leading to many challenges in the efforts to ensure child wellbeing. The biggest barriers we face are the increase in road crash, the shortage of community workers and the rate of unhealthy lifestyle choices increasing. 

Some of the fastest-growing urban environment are cities with fewer than 1 million inhabitants, however they are often sidelined in favour of the bigger cities. We believe there is a huge amount of opportunity here to focus on these secondary cities which are currently being left behind to test scalable solutions. 

Our focus

Fondation Botnar is seizing the opportunity inherent in secondary cities to influence and support systemic transformation into smart urban areas fit for children. The foundation is committed to the sustainable development of cities by supporting projects at the child, household, and community level. Working together, these three levels will help in building healthy and safe urban communities.

Fondation Botnar acts as a catalyst for change, bringing together diverse local partners - including the voices of young people - with local, regional, and national government in order to create policy that transforms cities into thriving and safe urban spaces. 

  • Participative city planning

    Our goal is to build relationships with key stakeholders in a local, regional, and national context to bring everyone together to transform cities into healthy and safe urban environments where children can thrive. We aim to achieve this by working with city mayors and authorities to ensure meaningful participation of children. The culmination of this work will hopefully achieve intelligent communities, a factor in the building of cities that not only use technological innovations but are socially smart.

  • Road safety

    Globally, more than 1.25 million people die as a result of road crashes each year, with an additional 50 million seriously injured. Road traffic injuries and deaths have a significant impact on individuals under the age of 18, who account for more than 186,000 road traffic deaths annually. Our goal is to build on the growing global recognition of population shifts to urban areas by addressing this challenge. Our focus is on reducing speeding, using collaboration between local stakeholders to improve infrastructure design and provide leadership on road safety.